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Philip Roth dead at 85: Writers, public figures remember Pulitzer Prize-winning author

Philip Roth – the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of "American Pastoral" and other highly acclaimed works such as "Portnoy's Complaint," "The Human Stain" and "The Plot Against America" – has died of congestive heart failure, The Associated Press reported late Tuesday. He was 85.

>> PHOTOS: Notable deaths 2018

Fellow writers and public figures took to Twitter to share their condolences and reflect on Roth's novels. Here's what they had to say:

>> Read more trending news 

– The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Philip Roth, fearless and celebrated author, dies at 85

Philip Roth, the prize-winning novelist and fearless narrator of sex, death, assimilation and fate, from the comic madness of "Portnoy's Complaint" to the elegiac lyricism of "American Pastoral," died Tuesday night at age 85.

Roth's literary agent, Andrew Wylie, told The Associated Press that he died in a New York City hospital of congestive heart failure.

Author of more than 25 books, Roth was a fierce satirist and uncompromising realist, confronting readers in a bold, direct style that scorned false sentiment or hopes for heavenly reward. He was an atheist who swore allegiance to earthly imagination, whether devising pornographic functions for raw liver or indulging romantic fantasies about Anne Frank. In "The Plot Against America," published in 2004, he placed his own family under the anti-Semitic reign of President Charles Lindbergh. In 2010, in "Nemesis," he subjected his native New Jersey to a polio epidemic.

He was among greatest writers never to win the Nobel Prize. But he received virtually every other literary honor, including two National Book Awards, two National Book Critics Circle prizes and, in 1998, the Pulitzer for "American Pastoral." He was in his 20s when he won his first award and awed critics and fellow writers by producing some of his most acclaimed novels in his 60s and 70s, including "The Human Stain" and "Sabbath's Theater," a savage narrative of lust and mortality he considered his finest work.

He identified himself as an American writer, not a Jewish one, but for Roth the American experience and the Jewish experience were often the same. While predecessors such as Saul Bellow and Bernard Malamud wrote of the Jews' painful adjustment from immigrant life, Roth's characters represented the next generation. Their first language was English, and they spoke without accents. They observed no rituals and belonged to no synagogues. The American dream, or nightmare, was to become "a Jew without Jews, without Judaism, without Zionism, without Jewishness." The reality, more often, was to be regarded as a Jew among gentiles and a gentile among Jews.

In the novel "The Ghost Writer" he quoted one of his heroes, Franz Kafka: "We should only read those books that bite and sting us." For his critics, his books were to be repelled like a swarm of bees.

Feminists, Jews and one ex-wife attacked him in print, and sometimes in person. Women in his books were at times little more than objects of desire and rage and The Village Voice once put his picture on its cover, condemning him as a misogynist. A panel moderator berated him for his comic portrayals of Jews, asking Roth if he would have written the same books in Nazi Germany. The Jewish scholar Gershom Scholem called "Portnoy's Complaint" the "book for which all anti-Semites have been praying." When Roth won the Man Booker International Prize, in 2011, a judge resigned, alleging that the author suffered from terminal solipsism and went "on and on and on about the same subject in almost every single book." In "Sabbath's Theater," Roth imagines the inscription for his title character's headstone: "Sodomist, Abuser of Women, Destroyer of Morals."

Ex-wife Claire Bloom wrote a best-selling memoir, "Leaving a Doll's House," in which the actress remembered reading the manuscript of his novel "Deception." With horror, she discovered his characters included a boring middle-aged wife named Claire, married to an adulterous writer named Philip. Bloom also described her ex-husband as cold, manipulative and unstable. (Although, alas, she still loved him). The book was published by Virago Press, whose founder, Carmen Callil, was the same judge who quit years later from the Booker committee.

Roth's wars also originated from within. He survived a burst appendix in the late 1960s and near-suicidal depression in 1987. After the disappointing reaction to his 1993 novel, "Operation Shylock," he fell again into severe depression and for years rarely communicated with the media. For all the humor in his work — and, friends would say, in private life — jacket photos usually highlighted the author's tense, dark-eyed glare. In 2012, he announced that he had stopped writing fiction and would instead dedicate himself to helping biographer Blake Bailey complete his life story. By 2015, he had retired from public life altogether.

He never promised to be his readers' friend; writing was its own reward, the narration of "life, in all its shameless impurity." Until his abrupt retirement, Roth was a dedicated, prolific author who often published a book a year and was generous to writers from other countries. For years, he edited the Writers from the Other Europe series, in which authors from Eastern Europe received exposure to American readers; Milan Kundera was among the beneficiaries. Roth also helped bring a wider readership to the acclaimed Israeli writer Aharon Appelfeld.

Roth began his career in rebellion against the conformity of the 1950s and ended it in defense of the security of the 1940s; he was never warmer than when writing about his childhood, or more sorrowful, and enraged, than when narrating the shock of innocence lost.

Philip Roth, fearless and celebrated author, dies at 85

Philip Roth, the prize-winning novelist and fearless narrator of sex, death, assimilation and fate, from the comic madness of "Portnoy's Complaint" to the elegiac lyricism of "American Pastoral," died Tuesday night at age 85.

Roth's literary agent, Andrew Wylie, said that the author died in a New York City hospital of congestive heart failure.

Author of more than 25 books, Roth was a fierce satirist and uncompromising realist, confronting readers in a bold, direct style that scorned false sentiment or hopes for heavenly reward. He was an atheist who swore allegiance to earthly imagination, whether devising pornographic functions for raw liver or indulging romantic fantasies about Anne Frank. In "The Plot Against America," published in 2004, he placed his own family under the anti-Semitic reign of President Charles Lindbergh. In 2010, in "Nemesis," he subjected his native New Jersey to a polio epidemic.

He was among the greatest writers never to win the Nobel Prize. But he received virtually every other literary honor, including two National Book Awards, two National Book Critics Circle prizes and, in 1998, the Pulitzer for "American Pastoral." He was in his 20s when he won his first award and awed critics and fellow writers by producing some of his most acclaimed novels in his 60s and 70s, including "The Human Stain" and "Sabbath's Theater," a savage narrative of lust and mortality he considered his finest work.

He identified himself as an American writer, not a Jewish one, but for Roth the American experience and the Jewish experience were often the same. While predecessors such as Saul Bellow and Bernard Malamud wrote of the Jews' painful adjustment from immigrant life, Roth's characters represented the next generation. Their first language was English, and they spoke without accents. They observed no rituals and belonged to no synagogues. The American dream, or nightmare, was to become "a Jew without Jews, without Judaism, without Zionism, without Jewishness." The reality, more often, was to be regarded as a Jew among gentiles and a gentile among Jews.

In the novel "The Ghost Writer" he quoted one of his heroes, Franz Kafka: "We should only read those books that bite and sting us." For his critics, his books were to be repelled like a swarm of bees.

Feminists, Jews and one ex-wife attacked him in print, and sometimes in person. Women in his books were at times little more than objects of desire and rage and The Village Voice once put his picture on its cover, condemning him as a misogynist. A panel moderator berated him for his comic portrayals of Jews, asking Roth if he would have written the same books in Nazi Germany. The Jewish scholar Gershom Scholem called "Portnoy's Complaint" the "book for which all anti-Semites have been praying." When Roth won the Man Booker International Prize, in 2011, a judge resigned, alleging that the author suffered from terminal solipsism and went "on and on and on about the same subject in almost every single book." In "Sabbath's Theater," Roth imagines the inscription for his title character's headstone: "Sodomist, Abuser of Women, Destroyer of Morals."

Ex-wife Claire Bloom wrote a best-selling memoir, "Leaving a Doll's House," in which the actress remembered reading the manuscript of his novel "Deception." With horror, she discovered his characters included a boring middle-aged wife named Claire, married to an adulterous writer named Philip. Bloom also described her ex-husband as cold, manipulative and unstable. (Although, alas, she still loved him). The book was published by Virago Press, whose founder, Carmen Callil, was the same judge who quit years later from the Booker committee.

Roth's wars also originated from within. He survived a burst appendix in the late 1960s and near-suicidal depression in 1987. After the disappointing reaction to his 1993 novel, "Operation Shylock," he fell again into severe depression and for years rarely communicated with the media. For all the humor in his work — and, friends would say, in private life — jacket photos usually highlighted the author's tense, dark-eyed glare. In 2012, he announced that he had stopped writing fiction and would instead dedicate himself to helping biographer Blake Bailey complete his life story, one he openly wished would not come out while he was alive. By 2015, he had retired from public life altogether.

He never promised to be his readers' friend; writing was its own reward, the narration of "life, in all its shameless impurity." Until his abrupt retirement, Roth was a dedicated, prolific author who often published a book a year and was generous to writers from other countries. For years, he edited the "Writers from the Other Europe" series, in which authors from Eastern Europe received exposure to American readers; Milan Kundera was among the beneficiaries. Roth also helped bring a wider readership to the acclaimed Israeli writer Aharon Appelfeld.

Roth began his career in rebellion against the conformity of the 1950s and ended it in defense of the security of the 1940s; he was never warmer than when writing about his childhood, or more sorrowful, and enraged, than when narrating the shock of innocence lost.

Roth was born in 1933 in Newark, New Jersey, a time and place he remembered lovingly in "The Facts," ''American Pastoral" and other works. The scolding, cartoonish parents of his novels were pure fiction. He adored his parents, especially his father, an insurance salesman to whom he paid tribute in the memoir "Patrimony." Roth would describe his childhood as "intensely secure and protected," at least at home. He was outgoing and brilliant and, tall and dark-haired, especially attractive to girls. In his teens he presumed he would become a lawyer, a most respectable profession in his family's world.

But after a year at Newark College of Rutgers University, Roth emulated an early literary hero, James Joyce, and fled his hometown. He transferred to Bucknell College in Pennsylvania and only returned to Newark on paper. By his early 20s, Roth was writing fiction — at first casually, soon with primary passion, with Roth observing he could never really be happy unless working on a novel, inside the "fun house" of his imagination. "The unlived, the surmise, fully drawn in print on paper, is the life whose meaning comes to matter most," he wrote in the novel "Exit Ghost."

After receiving a master's degree in English from the University of Chicago, he began publishing stories in The Paris Review and elsewhere. Bellow was an early influence, as were Thomas Wolfe, Flaubert, Henry James and Kafka, whose picture Roth hung in his writing room.

Acclaim and controversy were inseparable. A short story about Jews in the military, "Defender of the Faith," introduced Roth to accusations of Jewish self-hatred. His debut collection, published in 1959, was "Goodbye, Columbus," featuring a love (and lust) title story about a working class Jew and his wealthier girlfriend. It brought the writer a National Book Award and some extra-literary criticism.

The aunt of the main character, Neil Klugman, is a meddling worrywart, and the upper-middle-class relatives of Neil's girlfriend are satirized as shallow materialists. Roth believed he was simply writing about people he knew, but some Jews saw him as a traitor, subjecting his brethren to ridicule before the gentile world. A rabbi accused him of distorting the lives of Orthodox Jews. At a writers conference in the early 1960s, he was relentlessly accused of creating stories that affirmed the worst Nazi stereotypes.

But Roth insisted writing should express, not sanitize. After two relatively tame novels, "Letting Go" and "When She was Good," he abandoned his good manners with "Portnoy's Complaint," his ode to blasphemy against the "unholy trinity of "father, mother and Jewish son." Published in 1969, a great year for rebellion, it was an event, a birth, a summation, Roth's triumph over "the awesome graduate school authority of Henry James," as if history's lid had blown open and out erupted a generation of Jewish guilt and desire.

As narrated by Alexander Portnoy, from a psychiatrist's couch, Roth's novel satirized the dull expectations heaped upon "nice Jewish boys" and immortalized the most ribald manifestations of sexual obsession. His manic tour of one man's onanistic adventures led Jacqueline Susann to comment that "Philip Roth is a good writer, but I wouldn't want to shake hands with him." Although "Portnoy's Complaint" was banned in Australia and attacked by Scholem and others, many critics welcomed the novel as a declaration of creative freedom. "Portnoy's Complaint" sold millions, making Roth wealthy, and, more important, famous. The writer, an observer by nature, was now observed. He was an item in gossip columns, a name debated at parties. Strangers called out to him in the streets. Roth would remember hailing a taxi and, seeing that the driver's last name was Portnoy, commiserating over the book's notoriety.

In an Oval Office recording from November 1971, President Richard Nixon and White House chief of staff H.R. Haldeman discussed the famous author, whom Nixon apparently confused with the pornographer Samuel Roth.

____

Haldeman: I never read "Portnoy's Complaint," but I understand it was a well written book but just sickeningly filthy.

Nixon: Roth is of course a Jew.

Haldeman: Oh, yes ... He's brilliant in a sick way.

Nixon: Oh, I know —

Haldeman: Everything he's written has been sick ...

____

With Roth finding himself asked whether he really was Portnoy, several of his post-Portnoy novels amounted to a dare: Is it fact of fiction? In "The Anatomy Lesson," ''The Counterlife" and other novels, the featured character is a Jewish writer from New Jersey named Nathan Zuckerman. He is a man of similar age to Roth who just happened to have written a "dirty" best seller, "Carnovsky," and is lectured by friends and family for putting their lives into his books.

"Operation Skylock" featured a middle-aged writer named Philip Roth, haunted by an impersonator in Israel who has a wild plan to lead the Jews back to Europe. In interviews, Roth claimed (not very convincingly) the story was true, lamenting that only when he wrote fiction did people think he was writing about his life.

Even when Roth wrote non-fiction, the game continued. At the end of his autobiography, "The Facts," Roth included a disclaimer by Nathan Zuckerman himself, chastising his creator for a self-serving, inhibited piece of storytelling.

"As for characterization, you, Roth, are the least completely rendered of all your protagonists," Zuckerman tells him.

In the 1990s, after splitting with Bloom and again living full time in the United States (he had been spending much of his time in England), Roth reconnected with the larger world and culture of his native country. "American Pastoral" narrated a decent man's decline from high school sports star to victim of the '60s and the "indigenous American berserk." In "The Human Stain," he raged against the impeachment of President Bill Clinton over his affair with a White House intern. "The fantasy of purity is appalling. It's insane," he wrote.

In recent years, Roth was increasingly preoccupied with history and its sucker punch, how ordinary people were defeated by events beyond their control, like the Jews in "The Plot Against America" or the college student in "Indignation" who dies in the Korean War. Mortality, "the inevitable onslaught that is the end of life," became another subject, in "Everyman" and "The Humbling," despairing chronicles as told by a non-believer.

Writing proved the author's most enduring relationship. Roth, who married Bloom in 1990, had one previous wife. In 1959, he was married to the former Margaret Martinson Williams, a time remembered bitterly in "The Facts" and in his novel "My Life as a Man." They were legally separated in 1963 and she died in a car crash five years later. There were no children from either marriage.

Roth's non-literary life could be as strange, if not stranger than his fiction. In the mid-'90s, he split up with Bloom, whose acting roles included a part in Woody Allen's "Crimes and Misdemeanors." Roth then reportedly dated Mia Farrow, the ex-lover of Allen, who in another movie played a writer with the last name Roth.

Bloom turned her marriage into a memoir, and Roth turned her memoir into fiction. In the novel "I Married a Communist," one character just happens to have been married to an actress who wrote a book about him after their divorce.

"How could she publish this book and not expect him to do something?" he asks. "Did she imagine this openly aggressive hothead was going to do nothing in response?"

Stephen King among the honorees at PEN America gala

Stephen King has been presented an award by PEN America for literary service.

The author received his prize Tuesday night from Morgan Freeman, who starred in the film adaptation of King's "The Shawshank Redemption." King was praised by PEN, the literary and human rights organization, as an advocate for literacy and free expression.

PEN also honored student activists from the Florida high school where 17 people were fatally shot in February and two journalists imprisoned in Myanmar. CEO Carolyn Reidy of Simon & Schuster, which releases King's books, was the PEN America "Publisher Honoree."

PEN's annual fundraising gala was held at the American Museum of Natural History, where attendees included novelist Margaret Atwood, actors Michael Douglas and Catherine Zeta-Jones and Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist and PEN president Jennifer Egan.

Former Guess Who Singer Burton Cummings Injured in Serious Car Accident

Former Guess Who singer Burton Cummings suffered a concussion and numerous other injuries to his body in a car accident.

Continue reading…

Clint Walker, star of TV's 'Cheyenne,' dies at age 91

Clint Walker, the towering, strapping actor who handed down justice as the title character in the early TV western "Cheyenne," has died, his daughter said Tuesday.

Walker died Monday of congestive heart failure at a hospital in his longtime home of Grass Valley, California at age 91, his daughter, Valerie Walker, told The Associated Press.

"He was a warrior, he was fighting to the end," said Valerie Walker, a retired commercial pilot who was among the first women to fly for a major airline.

Clint Walker, whose film credits included "The Ten Commandments" and "The Dirty Dozen," wandered the West after the Civil War as the solitary adventurer Cheyenne Bodie in "Cheyenne," which ran for seven seasons on ABC starting in 1955.

Born Norman Eugene Walker in Hartford, Illinois, he later changed his name in both public and private life to the more cowboyish Clint.

He worked on Great Lakes cargo ships and Mississippi river boats and in Texas oil fields before becoming an armed security guard at the Sands Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas.

There, many Hollywood stars, including actor Van Johnson, saw the 6-foot-6, ruggedly handsome Walker and encouraged him to give the movies a try, which Walker said he did after realizing the money would be better and the bullets would be fake.

He soon found himself under consideration for his first role in "The Ten Commandments," starring Charlton Heston and Yul Brynner. He had a meeting with the film's legendary director Cecil B. DeMille, but was late after stopping to help a woman change a tire and feared he'd blown his shot.

"He just exuded power," Walker said of DeMille in a 2012 interview for the archive of the television academy. "He looked me up and down and said, 'You're late young man.'" "I thought 'oh no, my career is over before it even started.'"

Walker explained why he was late and said Demille responded "Yes, I know all about it, that was my secretary."

Walker was cast as the captain of the pharaoh's guard in the movie that came out in 1956.

He beat out several big names for the role of "Cheyenne," but speculated that it was because he was already under contract for much cheaper than the other actors would demand to Warner Bros., which produced the show.

Based roughly on a 1947 movie, "Cheyenne" began as an hour-long program that originally was alternated with two other Westerns. The only one of the three programs to survive, it made Walker a star, although a restless one.

He abandoned the role in 1958 in a contract dispute, and Ty Hardin was brought in briefly to replace him. He soon returned under better terms, and remained through the show's seven-season run.

Walker's most memorable big-screen appearance came in 1967's "The Dirty Dozen," whose all-star cast included Lee Marvin, Ernest Borgnine and Charles Bronson. In it, Marvin baits the much-larger Walker into attacking him then throws him to the ground in a training demonstration to his World War II crew.

He appeared in many other movies including the westerns "Fort Dobbs," ''Yellowstone Kelly" and "Gold of the Seven Saints" and in the Doris Day and Rock Hudson film "Send Me No Flowers" in 1964. He most recently lent his voice to 1998's "Small Soldiers."

Walker nearly died in 1971 when a ski pole pierced his heart in California's Sierra Nevada.

"They rushed me to a hospital where two doctors pronounced me dead," he recalled in 1987. "No pulse, no heartbeat; I was clinically dead." A third doctor detected life, and an operation saved him.

He would fully recover, and go on to live another 47 years.

In addition to his daughter, he is survived by his wife of 30 years Susan Cavallari Walker.

___

This story has been corrected to show that Walker did not work as a sheriff's deputy.

___

The late AP Entertainment Writer Bob Thomas contributed to this report.

___

Follow Andrew Dalton on Twitter: https://twitter.com/andyjamesdalton .

CBS to finish season atop ratings, for 10th straight year

CBS is finishing another television season atop the television ratings, but the network had to sweat a little this time.

The traditional TV season that started in September ends on Wednesday, and CBS will win bragging rights for the 10th year in a row, the Nielsen company said. CBS has won for 15 of the last 16 years, the only exception being Fox during the height of "American Idol."

Nielsen says CBS averages 9 million viewers in prime-time this season. NBC is averaging 8.9 million, but there's not enough time to catch up. NBC made it particularly close this year because it televised both the Super Bowl and the Winter Olympics, which let the network dominate in February.

But CBS withstood it with the strength of its regular schedule.

"This is an amazing accomplishment," said Kelly Kahl, CBS entertainment president.

Still, it's NBC's closest finish to CBS in 16 years. NBC won among viewers aged 18-to-49-years-old, the demographic its advertisers care most about, for the fourth time in five years.

ABC is averaging 6.1 million viewers this season, and Fox is at 4.9 million, Nielsen said.

CBS won the last full week of the TV season, averaging 6.6 million viewers. NBC had 5 million viewers, ABC had 4.5 million, Fox had 2.5 million, Univision had 1.5 million, the CW and ION Television had 1.2 million and Telemundo had 1.1 million.

TNT was the week's most popular cable network, averaging 3.06 million viewers in prime-time. Fox News Channel had 2.34 million, ESPN had 2.28 million, MSNBC had 1.67 million and USA had 1.39 million.

ABC's "World News Tonight" topped the evening newscasts with an average of 8.2 million viewers. NBC's "Nightly News" was second with 7.8 million and the "CBS Evening News" had 5.7 million viewers.

For the week of May 14-20, the top 10 shows, their networks and viewerships: "NCIS," CBS, 12.71 million; "Roseanne," ABC, 10.74 million; "NCIS: New Orleans," CBS, 9.44 million; NBA Conference Finals: Golden State at Houston, Game 1, TNT, 8.9 million; "The Voice" (Monday), NBC, 8.7 million; NBA Conference Finals: Cleveland at Boston, Game 2, ESPN, 8.42 million; "60 Minutes," CBS, 8.36 million; "The Voice" (Tuesday), NBC, 8.16 million; "Billboard Music Awards," NBC, 7.87 million; "NCIS: Los Angeles," CBS, 7.82 million.

___

ABC is owned by The Walt Disney Co. CBS is owned by CBS Corp. CW is a joint venture of Warner Bros. Entertainment and CBS Corp. Fox is owned by 21st Century Fox. NBC and Telemundo are owned by Comcast Corp. ION Television is owned by ION Media Networks.

___

Online: http://www.nielsen.com

Trayvon's parents say Weinstein's company owes them $150,000

The parents of slain Florida teen Trayvon Martin say The Weinstein Company owes them at least $150,000 for optioning the rights to their book in order to make a yet unaired television series based on their son's legacy.

Sybrina Fulton and Tracy Martin filed court papers last week in the company's case in federal bankruptcy court in Delaware. The television series has been filmed and they are owed fees for "executive producer services," the parents said in the court filing.

If the television series airs, the parents will be owed further money, the court filing said.

The court filing also said the deal includes an option for the studio to purchase movie rights to their book, "Rest in Power: The Enduring Life of Trayvon Martin," though that hasn't been exercised yet.

Earlier this month, a judge said she would approve a private equity firm's purchase of the studio. The company was forced into bankruptcy by the sexual misconduct scandal that brought down Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein.

Trayvon Martin was fatally shot by George Zimmerman in 2012 as Martin walked home from a convenience store in Sanford, Florida. Zimmerman was acquitted.

Martin's death became a rallying cry for millions of black Americans seeking justice for the fatal shooting of an unarmed black teen.

Like Martin's parents, several dozen actors, writers, producers and companies have filed court papers saying The Weinstein Company owes them money. Those claims will be addressed at a hearing in Delaware next month.

Poland's Olga Tokarczuk wins Man Booker International Prize

Polish novelist Olga Tokarczuk won the prestigious Man Booker International Prize for fiction Tuesday with "Flights," a novel that charts multiple journeys in time, space and human anatomy.

"Flights" beat five other finalists, including Iraqi writer Ahmed Saadawi's horror story "Frankenstein in Baghdad" and South Korean author Han Kang's meditative novel "The White Book."

Tokarczuk's novel combines tales of modern-day travel with the story of a 17th century anatomist who dissected his own amputated leg and the journey of composer Frederic Chopin's heart from Paris to Warsaw after his death.

The judging panel led by writer Lisa Appignanesi called the "Flights" a witty, playful novel in which "the contemporary condition of perpetual movement" meets the certainty of death.

Tokarczuk is one of Poland's best-known authors. She has been criticized by Polish conservatives — and received death threats — for criticizing aspects of the country's past, including its episodes of anti-Semitism.

The prize is a counterpart to the Man Booker Prize for English-language novels and is open to books in any language that have been translated into English.

The 50,000-pound ($67,000) award is split evenly between the writer and her translator, Jennifer Croft.

R. Kelly loses lawsuit against Georgia venue after attorneys quit

R. Kelly’s lawsuit against a Georgia venue was thrown out when he failed to appear in court.

In a May 15 filing, U.S. District Judge John Robert Blake dismissed the singer’s case against Macon Coliseum in Macon, Georgia. In the suit, Kelly’s management company, RSK Enterprises, claimed Macon Coliseum-operator Comcast Spectacor did not pay him $100,000 for a show he performed. Kelly asked for that amount plus damages.

>> Read more trending news 

The case was thrown out because Kelly failed to appear in a Chicago court. He also did not appear at hearings on April 3 and May 8 and was warned “that any future failures to appear may subject this case to a dismissal for want of prosecution,” according to court documents.

Furthermore, the two attorneys representing RSK Enterprises, Heather Blaise and Travis Life, stepped down from the case in April.

“As a result of ethical obligations, Ms. Blaise and Mr. Life are no longer able to represent plaintiff,” part of the April 25 motion read, according to The Chicago Tribune.

The dismissal comes after a Texas woman, Faith A. Rodgers, filed a suit in a New York court Monday seeking unspecified damages, alleging sexual battery, false imprisonment and failure to disclose a sexually transmitted disease. Spotify announced earlier this month that it would no longer promote Kelly’s music by having it in playlists under a new hateful content policy.

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