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Texas woman sentenced to jail for trying to take 40 conchs from Key West waters

A Texas woman has been sentenced to 15 days in jail and a $500 fine for trying to take 40 queen conchs out of Key West, Florida, and home to Dallas.

>> Read more trending news 

Diana Fiscal-Gonzalez pleaded no contest on July 13 to second-degree misdemeanor charges related to removing the state-protected mollusks from ocean waters, according to Florida Keys News

Fiscal-Gonzalez, 30, apologized to the judge and said she didn’t know that removing conchs from Florida waters was illegal, the newspaper reported

After receiving a tip, an officer with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission caught the woman hosing down three plastic containers full of the conchs on July 13 and arrested her. She said she planned to clean the mollusks and give them away as gifts, according to local news reports.

The agency said the conchs were returned to the water and most were still alive, Florida Keys News reported.

Fiscal-Gonzalez is scheduled to begin her 15-day jail stint on Aug. 10.

Mother charged for allegedly allowing two men to rape her toddler

A mother in Independence, Missouri is facing child abuse charges after she admitted to taking her 2 year-old daughter to a home where two men allegedly raped the child.

>> Read more trending news

According to KSHB, Azzie Watson was charged with three counts of abuse or neglect and one count of child endangerment.

On June 29, police in Kansas City were called to a hospital to investigate a report of a rape, according to WDAF.

Police were then given a recording made by Watson’s boyfriend, Charles Green, in which Watson admits to repeatedly taking her daughter to a house and watching two men rape her daughter. In the recording, she says that her daughter was raped about five times.

Watson later changed her story, claiming that she lied about the incidents because was scared of Green, according to court documents obtained by WDAF

The 2-year-old has tested positive for an STD and meth was also found in the child’s system, police say.

Green admitted to smoking meth with Watson while children were present. He also faces two counts of child endangerment.

Early dinners don’t just help fight body fat — they may lower cancer risk, study finds

Consuming your calories earlier in the day rather than later has been known to boost weight loss and fight body fat.

>> Read more trending news 

And new research published Tuesday in the International Journal of Cancer suggests eating your last meal before 9 p.m. — or at least two hours before bed — may also lower risk of breast and prostate cancers.

Researchers in Spain conducted a population-based case-control study between 2008-2013 and followed 621 individuals with prostate cancer; 1,205 with breast cancer; 872 males without cancer and 1,321 females without cancer. The two latter groups made up the control group.

>> Related: These 9 healthy-sounding foods have more sugar than a Krispy Kreme doughnut

Previous research has also shown an association between breast/prostate cancer risk and night-shift work and an individual’s sleep-wake cycle, lead author Manolis Kogevinas told CNN. But no night-shift workers were included in the study.

“We assessed whether timing of meals is associated with breast and prostate cancer risk taking into account lifestyle and chronotype, a characteristic correlating with preference for morning or evening activity,” Kogevinas and his team wrote in the study.

>> Related: Why are more black women dying of breast cancer compared to white women?

Each participant was interviewed about their eating patterns (including timing of meals), sleep patterns, chronotype and completed a “Food Frequency Questionnaire.” Researchers also measured participants’ adherence to global cancer prevention recommendations.

Findings

According to the study, participants sleeping two or more hours after dinner had a 20 percent lower risk of developing prostate or breast cancer combined compared to subjects sleeping immediately after dinner.

>> Related: FDA approves Lilly pill for common advanced breast cancer

Researchers observed a similar difference when participants ate dinner before 9 p.m. and when they ate after 10 p.m.

Those who were more likely to adhere to cancer prevention recommendations, as well as “morning people” also had lower risk of developing breast or prostate cancer.

>> Related: Men’s testosterone levels influenced by where they grow up, study suggests

“The present study suggests that changes in timing of circadian controlled activities in sleep or diet that are less extreme than those observed in night shift work, are associated with long term health effects increasing the risk of the most prevalent cancers worldwide,” study authors concluded.

>> Related: Work the night shift? You may be at higher risk of obesity, study says

“The World Cancer Research Fund estimates that about a quarter to a third of the commonest cancers are attributable to excess body weight, physical inactivity and poor diet, making these the most common causes of cancers after smoking,” they added. “If timing is proven to be a significant modifier of these effects then it would be important to also define eating and sleep time as one of the recommendations.”

>> Related: Here's what these Atlanta dietitians eat for dinner

Limitations

The self-reported assessment of food consumption was retrospective, which authors noted may have limitations. Another limitation of the study: small variability in meal timing, which may affect precision.

More than 100 ‘dangerous' trees flagged for removal still standing in Winter Park

Orlando and Winter Park are among several Central Florida cities with the designation of being a "Tree City U.S.A."

9 Investigates learned at any given time, there are dozens of trees deemed dangerous or waiting for removal in both municipalities.

Investigative reporter Karla Ray asked what’s being done to minimize the risk to residents since some of the trees have been flagged for several years without any action taken to have them removed.

City leaders work to prioritize trees that are larger or close to utility lines to be removed more quickly than those that are smaller and pose a minimal threat of damage.

While many people do not want to see trees removed, attorneys said leaving the trees poses a safety risk.

On Braemar Drive in Winter Park, spray paint marks one of the major reasons Bill Crannick’s family moved in.

“We bought the house because of the beautiful oaks. This neighborhood is known for its beautiful trees,” Crannick said.

The swing where Crannick’s children enjoyed the shade from the laurel oak will soon be gone. The tree, and another across the street, are two of dozens in the city’s right of way that are flagged for removal. Many trees, particularly laurel oaks planted decades ago, are reaching their life expectancy.

“Especially because of hurricane season coming, they feel it’s a danger, and they’re going to take these down,” Crannick said.

Over on Byron Drive, there are three on Winter Park’s removal list in various stages; one spray-painted, another a stump and the third fully ground into mulch.  

The number of trees flagged for removal from city to city changes frequently, but earlier this month, Winter Park had more than 130 in its queue.

“Across the city of Orlando and Winter Park, there are trees that are ticking time bombs. Dead trees that are going to fall into a roadway. It’s not a matter of if, but a matter of when,” attorney Matt Morgan said.

Two years ago, Morgan won a $1.1 million judgment against the city of Orlando on behalf of a client who was injured due to a falling tree. A downtown Orlando tree, that had been flagged for removal for years, fell on his client causing serious injury. 

“Trees have a life expectancy, and when they die, we should take them down before they kill or injure citizens,” Morgan said.

But city leaders have to prioritize. Even though Orlando’s removal list is shorter than Winter Park’s, with 20 or so trees deemed dangerous or in need of removal, some of the trees have been on the list for more than two years.

Orlando’s assistant division manager of parks, David Wagg, said it’s not dangerous to leave the flagged trees standing.

“No, it’s not, because every tree is different as to why they got on that list,” Wagg said. Wagg explained that with taxpayers putting up around $450,000 on tree trimming and removal each year, some smaller trees will take more time to remove as the city ranks risk due to size or proximity to power lines.

“It’s a difficult task, and we work on it every day,” Wagg said.

Other "Tree City U.S.A." cities, including Altamonte Springs and Apopka, only have a few trees on a current removal list. The City of Sanford recently did an audit and identified a list of trees needing to be removed as well.

 

More than 100 ‘dangerous' trees flagged for removal still standing in Winter Park

Orlando and Winter Park are among several Central Florida cities with the designation of being a "Tree City U.S.A."

9 Investigates learned at any given time, there are dozens of trees deemed dangerous or waiting for removal in both municipalities.

Investigative reporter Karla Ray asked what’s being done to minimize the risk to residents since some of the trees have been flagged for several years without any action taken to have them removed.

City leaders work to prioritize trees that are larger or close to utility lines to be removed more quickly than those that are smaller and pose a minimal threat of damage.

While many people do not want to see trees removed, attorneys said leaving the trees poses a safety risk.

On Braemar Drive in Winter Park, spray paint marks one of the major reasons Bill Crannick’s family moved in.

“We bought the house because of the beautiful oaks. This neighborhood is known for its beautiful trees,” Crannick said.

The swing where Crannick’s children enjoyed the shade from the laurel oak will soon be gone. The tree, and another across the street, are two of dozens in the city’s right of way that are flagged for removal. Many trees, particularly laurel oaks planted decades ago, are reaching their life expectancy.

“Especially because of hurricane season coming, they feel it’s a danger, and they’re going to take these down,” Crannick said.

Over on Byron Drive, there are three on Winter Park’s removal list in various stages; one spray-painted, another a stump and the third fully ground into mulch.  

The number of trees flagged for removal from city to city changes frequently, but earlier this month, Winter Park had more than 130 in its queue.

“Across the city of Orlando and Winter Park, there are trees that are ticking time bombs. Dead trees that are going to fall into a roadway. It’s not a matter of if, but a matter of when,” attorney Matt Morgan said.

Two years ago, Morgan won a $1.1 million judgment against the city of Orlando on behalf of a client who was injured due to a falling tree. A downtown Orlando tree, that had been flagged for removal for years, fell on his client causing serious injury. 

“Trees have a life expectancy, and when they die, we should take them down before they kill or injure citizens,” Morgan said.

But city leaders have to prioritize. Even though Orlando’s removal list is shorter than Winter Park’s, with 20 or so trees deemed dangerous or in need of removal, some of the trees have been on the list for more than two years.

Orlando’s assistant division manager of parks, David Wagg, said it’s not dangerous to leave the flagged trees standing.

“No, it’s not, because every tree is different as to why they got on that list,” Wagg said. Wagg explained that with taxpayers putting up around $450,000 on tree trimming and removal each year, some smaller trees will take more time to remove as the city ranks risk due to size or proximity to power lines.

“It’s a difficult task, and we work on it every day,” Wagg said.

Other "Tree City U.S.A." cities, including Altamonte Springs and Apopka, only have a few trees on a current removal list. The City of Sanford recently did an audit and identified a list of trees needing to be removed as well.

 

Kidnapped baby burned, dies from his injuries, police searching for suspects

Police in Natchitoches, Louisiana, are searching for those responsible for killing a baby Monday night in a horrendous act of brutality.

>> Read more trending news 

Authorities were called to a trailer park just after 9 p.m. over a missing 6-month-old infant, who had disappeared from his home after two strangers showed up at the door, according to KSLA-TV.

Police said a woman at the residence opened her door and was sprayed in the face with an unknown substance.

KSLA reported the woman ran from the attackers and when she returned, the baby was gone.

Just over an hour later, investigators responded to a call about a fire and found a baby with “obvious burns over his body,” according to the news station.

>> Related: DNA test solves 1988 cold case rape, murder of 8-year-old April Tinsley, suspect arrested

The baby later died from his injuries. Police are still investigating and haven’t made any arrests. 

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