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How your lawn's fertilizers can contribute to the red tide; counties combat their use

Water. It is everywhere in Florida, from our beaches to our lakes and canals. The red tide has not only affected our beaches, the ecosystem and tourism, but harmful algae blooms have also affected other bodies of water, such as inland lakes and canals closer to our homes.

 

For months, we have seen how some canals have turned red and how some even filled with green slime-like algae. Although algae blooms can occur naturally, nutrient runoff is one of Florida’s biggest problems contributing to the harmful blooms.

 

As much as fertilizers can help our lawns grow, it can also end up making algae grow, often exponentially. Our waterways are all connected, and even if you don’t live near a lake of a canal, the runoff from the fertilizer you use ends up in lakes, canals and eventually in our coastline.

 

Just as we have seen this year, it’s not only about the harmful algae blooms. It’s also about the ecosystem. The nutrient runoff harms animals’ nervous systems, killing them.

 

Download: Free WFTV weather app receive weather and lightning alerts

MORE  CLIMATE CHANGE NEWS

 

To combat nutrient runoff, some counties across Central Florida have enacted ordinances. For example, in Seminole County, fertilizers containing nitrogen or phosphorus cannot be applied during the summer rainy season.

 

There is more: Florida beaches deal with red tide on Gulf, feces in Miami

 

There are other options to fertilize your lawn, if you must, during the rainy season. There are summer blend and slow-release fertilizers. Also, yard clippings should not be blown into storm drains. There are some native plants that act as a buffer to filter nutrients out before they run off into the lakes.

 

ANOTHER ONE: New outbreak of red tide shows up in northwest Florida

 

Not all nutrients come from fertilizers, though. Agriculture, storm water runoff and septic tanks can also release nutrients to waterways, also triggering harmful algae blooms.

 

How your lawn's fertilizers can contribute to the red tide; counties combat their use

Water. It is everywhere in Florida, from our beaches to our lakes and canals. The red tide has not only affected our beaches, the ecosystem and tourism, but harmful algae blooms have also affected other bodies of water, such as inland lakes and canals closer to our homes.

 

For months, we have seen how some canals have turned red and how some even filled with green slime-like algae. Although algae blooms can occur naturally, nutrient runoff is one of Florida’s biggest problems contributing to the harmful blooms.

 

As much as fertilizers can help our lawns grow, it can also end up making algae grow, often exponentially. Our waterways are all connected, and even if you don’t live near a lake of a canal, the runoff from the fertilizer you use ends up in lakes, canals and eventually in our coastline.

 

Just as we have seen this year, it’s not only about the harmful algae blooms. It’s also about the ecosystem. The nutrient runoff harms animals’ nervous systems, killing them.

 

Download: Free WFTV weather app receive weather and lightning alerts

MORE  CLIMATE CHANGE NEWS

 

To combat nutrient runoff, some counties across Central Florida have enacted ordinances. For example, in Seminole County, fertilizers containing nitrogen or phosphorus cannot be applied during the summer rainy season.

 

There is more: Florida beaches deal with red tide on Gulf, feces in Miami

 

There are other options to fertilize your lawn, if you must, during the rainy season. There are summer blend and slow-release fertilizers. Also, yard clippings should not be blown into storm drains. There are some native plants that act as a buffer to filter nutrients out before they run off into the lakes.

 

ANOTHER ONE: New outbreak of red tide shows up in northwest Florida

 

Not all nutrients come from fertilizers, though. Agriculture, storm water runoff and septic tanks can also release nutrients to waterways, also triggering harmful algae blooms.

 

How your lawn's fertilizers can contribute to the red tide; counties combat their use

Water. It is everywhere in Florida, from our beaches to our lakes and canals. The red tide has not only affected our beaches, the ecosystem and tourism, but harmful algae blooms have also affected other bodies of water, such as inland lakes and canals closer to our homes.

 

For months, we have seen how some canals have turned red and how some even filled with green slime-like algae. Although algae blooms can occur naturally, nutrient runoff is one of Florida’s biggest problems contributing to the harmful blooms.

 

As much as fertilizers can help our lawns grow, it can also end up making algae grow, often exponentially. Our waterways are all connected, and even if you don’t live near a lake of a canal, the runoff from the fertilizer you use ends up in lakes, canals and eventually in our coastline.

 

Just as we have seen this year, it’s not only about the harmful algae blooms. It’s also about the ecosystem. The nutrient runoff harms animals’ nervous systems, killing them.

 

Download: Free WFTV weather app receive weather and lightning alerts

MORE  CLIMATE CHANGE NEWS

 

To combat nutrient runoff, some counties across Central Florida have enacted ordinances. For example, in Seminole County, fertilizers containing nitrogen or phosphorus cannot be applied during the summer rainy season.

 

There is more: Florida beaches deal with red tide on Gulf, feces in Miami

 

There are other options to fertilize your lawn, if you must, during the rainy season. There are summer blend and slow-release fertilizers. Also, yard clippings should not be blown into storm drains. There are some native plants that act as a buffer to filter nutrients out before they run off into the lakes.

 

ANOTHER ONE: New outbreak of red tide shows up in northwest Florida

 

Not all nutrients come from fertilizers, though. Agriculture, storm water runoff and septic tanks can also release nutrients to waterways, also triggering harmful algae blooms.

 

Tavares High School head football coach resigns amid criticism from parents

A Tavares High School football coach resigned amid allegations that he treated players harshly.

Head coach Scott Armatti is accused of calling players names and telling one to play through pain two weeks after having surgery.

Officials said Monday that Armatti stepped down after the school district launched an investigation into his conduct.

"I think this has been coming down the line for six or eight months. People have been unhappy with the things going on," parent Scott Stinson said. "This isn't about losing football games. We definitely want to win, but this is not what this is about. It's about the way the players were being treated and the way the coaches were being treated."

Read: Chief: Anonymous letter claiming rape sparked Oviedo High School investigation

Some players and parents said they had had enough Friday.

"I guess it just came to a head Friday night," parent Bob Frazer said. "It wasn't a good game. A lot of (the players) just walked off and left their pads at the field house and called it a season."

Parents said they met to discuss Armatti, and they sent an email to the school's principal, listing examples of his poor behavior.

They said he referred to an black player as "a thug after a penalty" and that he told another player he "was too white to run the ball outside."

Parents said they heard Armatti call one player a "dumb (expletive)" and a second player another expletive.

They said he told a player who had surgery two weeks ago to "suck it up and play through your pain."

Stinson said he knew there were issues.

"It was disheartening to hear," he said.

The district said Armatti continues to work as a teacher at the school.

Parents said they met with the principal Monday afternoon.

Woman accused of strangling baby with lights may get case thrown out

A Seminole County woman accused of strangling her infant daughter with holiday lights and blaming her 2-year-old son is trying to get her case thrown out.

Lawyers for the mother claim the case has crumbled so badly, prosecutors should be stopped from going forward.

Their claim hinges on the fact that the medical examiner said the baby’s death was an accident.

Read: Mother accused of strangling infant with holiday lights leaves jail for 1st time since 2016

The defense argues there's no way to convict Kristen DePasquale of murder if no one's willing to classify her daughter's death as a homicide.

A letter from the Brevard County Medical Examiner claims that a toddler has the strength to strangle an infant and cause a loss of consciousness in 10 to 20 seconds.

It's been four months since prosecutors first admitted they had a major hole in the murder case.

"She was extremely happy on the phone yesterday when she was told that today was going to happen. Tearfully ecstatic," said public defender Jared Shapiro.

Read: Newly released pictures show what led to arrest of Oviedo mom accused in infant's death

DePasquale's lawyer tells me he's waited long enough for the state to dismiss this case, so now he's forcing the issue.

Originally, the Volusia County Medical Examiner looked at Mia DePasquale's body, looked at the Halloween lights used to strangle her, decided her younger brother couldn't have done it and ruled it a homicide.

"The original medical examiner admits that she was not qualified to calculate force necessary from a ligature to produce strangulation,” said WFTV legal analyst Bill Sheaffer.

Sheaffer says it's a circumstantial case on shaky ground and even an unlikely conviction would be overturned on appeal.

"As soon as you had a conflicting opinion that this was a possible accident, as opposed to homicide, you have built in reasonable doubt. And you have multiple individuals who had access to the child. How are you going to prove the case?” he said.

The state attorney's office had no comment.

Read: Attorneys agree to keep officer's opinions in toddler's death out of trial

DePasquale will be in court Oct. 9 to see whether the judge thinks she should stand trial for murder.

She's been out of jail on bond ever since that second medical examiner decided the death could be an accident.

Woman accused of strangling baby with lights may get case thrown out

A Seminole County woman accused of strangling her infant daughter with holiday lights and blaming her 2-year-old son is trying to get her case thrown out.

Lawyers for the mother claim the case has crumbled so badly, prosecutors should be stopped from going forward.

Their claim hinges on the fact that the medical examiner said the baby’s death was an accident.

Read: Mother accused of strangling infant with holiday lights leaves jail for 1st time since 2016

The defense argues there's no way to convict Kristen DePasquale of murder if no one's willing to classify her daughter's death as a homicide.

A letter from the Brevard County Medical Examiner claims that a toddler has the strength to strangle an infant and cause a loss of consciousness in 10 to 20 seconds.

It's been four months since prosecutors first admitted they had a major hole in the murder case.

"She was extremely happy on the phone yesterday when she was told that today was going to happen. Tearfully ecstatic," said public defender Jared Shapiro.

Read: Newly released pictures show what led to arrest of Oviedo mom accused in infant's death

DePasquale's lawyer tells me he's waited long enough for the state to dismiss this case, so now he's forcing the issue.

Originally, the Volusia County Medical Examiner looked at Mia DePasquale's body, looked at the Halloween lights used to strangle her, decided her younger brother couldn't have done it and ruled it a homicide.

"The original medical examiner admits that she was not qualified to calculate force necessary from a ligature to produce strangulation,” said WFTV legal analyst Bill Sheaffer.

Sheaffer says it's a circumstantial case on shaky ground and even an unlikely conviction would be overturned on appeal.

"As soon as you had a conflicting opinion that this was a possible accident, as opposed to homicide, you have built in reasonable doubt. And you have multiple individuals who had access to the child. How are you going to prove the case?” he said.

The state attorney's office had no comment.

Read: Attorneys agree to keep officer's opinions in toddler's death out of trial

DePasquale will be in court Oct. 9 to see whether the judge thinks she should stand trial for murder.

She's been out of jail on bond ever since that second medical examiner decided the death could be an accident.

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